Thursday, February 23, 2012

Rhyan Coffee Table


The first blog post I ever wrote was a plan for building our Pottery Barn inspired coffee table. To this day that has been one of my most popular posts! But I've learned a lot since I drew up those plans. I know better building techniques and I'm better at drawing with Sketchup. And that's why today's post is an updated plan for my favorite coffee table!


The original cost $700 (it's no longer available) but my husband and I built this table out of pine for about $60, not including hardware. That was a $640 savings! And we could not be happier with how it turned out! Want to save that money yourself? Give these plans a try! You can also see my original coffee table plans here, my matching end table plans here, and my matching console here. If you need more inspiration or plans, be sure to check out Ana White's website. She also has great tips on wood types, finishing, and building in general. (Check out her plan catalog to browse all the plans available)


Now, down to business! These plans are actually slightly different from the dimensions of the inspiration table and the table I built, but they use standard lumber sizes. I could have saved myself a lot of headaches if I’d thought all that through before I started. Oops. :) But don’t worry, I’ve corrected the plans to make it easier for you! I also drew this version to accommodate drawer slides (the table I built doesn't have them and works fine, but it would be really nice to have them).



Please read all the directions before beginning, and cut your pieces as you go, measuring before each cut. Use 2” screws or pocket holes with 1 1/4" screws unless otherwise indicated. Always use glue. Pre-drill and countersink your screws. Home Improvement stores will generally cut your plywood for you. Ask them to cut your shelves to size to save you some trouble. I have not built from these exact plans, so use measure lots to make sure things work out! And don’t forget to check out Knock-Off Wood for more tips!

Shopping List:
6 2x2 @ 8’
2 1x2 @ 8’
1 1x10 @ 10’
1 1x8 @ 10’
1 1x6 @ 8'
1 1x6 @ 10'
1 sheet plywood (I used ½” thick)
Several small L-Brackets OR Scrap wood
6 drawer pulls

Tools:
Saw
Drill
2” screws (or Kreg Jig & 1 1/4" self tapping screws)
1 ¼” screws
Wood glue
Wood filler

Cut List:
A)  4    2x2 @ 18” (legs)
B)  6    2x2 @ 20” (side rails)
C)  2    1/2" plywood @ 7.5 x 20" (side panels)
D)  6    2x2 @ 45” (front & back rails)
E)  4    1x2 @ 7 ½” (stiles)
F)  ½” strips of scrap wood OR several small metal L-Brackets (shelf supports)
G)  3    ½” plywood @  45x20”(shelves)
H)  2    1x2 @ 20” (drawer dividers)
I)  3     1x2 @ 14 ½” (center divider)
J)  6     1x10 @ 11 ¾” (drawer bottoms)
K)  6   1x8 @ 14 ¼” (drawer fronts)
L)  6    1x6 @ 13 ¼” (drawer backs)
M) 12  1x6 @ 9 ¼” (drawer sides)
N)  4    1x2 @ 20” (drawer supports)

Step 1: Start by assembling the short ends of the table.

Attach the drawer supports (N) to the side panels (C), lining one up with the top edge and one with the bottom (the rest of my pictures only show the bottom support):

Assemble the the legs (A) & side rails (B).  Attach the bottom rail between the legs leaving a 1” gap at the bottom of the leg. Then attach the center rail leaving 7 1/2” in between. Attach the top rail flush with the top of the legs. If you have a Kreg Jig, you will be in good shape! I did this without, just screwed through the legs and into the rails but it was harder and we probably risked splitting the wood more. But it can be done:

Insert the side panel (C) in the gap between the bottom and center rails. Keep the drawer supports flush with the face of the legs to make sure your drawers fit correctly later. Attach the panel through the drawer supports using a Kreg jig (if you don't have a kreg jig, you can drill through the rails and legs into the 1x2 drawer supports instead. Do this before attaching the top rail so you have room to work):

Step 2: Connect the short ends.

Once the sides are complete, attach the back bottom & center rails (D) in between the sides. Leave a 1” gap below the bottom rail, and a 7 ¼” gap between the bottom and center rails. They will line up with the rails on the short ends. Repeat for the front rails:

Step 3: Attach the stiles.

Attach the stiles (E) between the bottom and center rails as shown below. There will be 2 stiles on each side, with 14 ½” between the stiles and the legs. You can use a Kreg jig or drill through the rails. Repeat for the front stiles:


4. Attach the top rails.

Attach the top rails on the front & back by using a Kreg jig or drilling through the legs:


Step 5: Bottom shelf.

Next you need to cut some ½” strips of wood (F) to use as shelf supports. Leave a gap above the supports equal to the thickness of the plywood you will use for the shelves. I used ½” plywood, so I left a ½” gap above the supports for the shelf to sit in. Attach the supports for the bottom shelf as shown above using 1 ¼” screws. I had a left over 1x12 laying around, so I cut ½” strips off the side of it, parallel to the grain. You’ll want to do the supports as you go. For now just do the bottom supports, then place the bottom shelf, and we'll move on to the middle supports and shelf later:


You could also use small L brackets like these placed around the edges instead of wood strips: Set the bottom shelf (G) in place. You can attach it with glue and screws or finishing nails, but mine is just sitting in there. Note: this was the tecnhique I used when building my table, but if I did it again I would skip these supports and use my kreg jig to attach the shelf to the rails with 3/4" Kreg screws. However, if you don't have a Kreg jig this will do the trick! Also, if you are planning to use drawer slides I don't think you would even need the bottom shelf!

Step 6: Drawer Dividers

Attach the drawer dividers (H) to the bottom shelf, running between each set of stiles as shown below. Attach by screwing down through the dividers into the shelf:



Step 7. Center Dividers

Then attach the center dividers (I) to the bottom shelf as shown below . The dividers should be centered between the front & back of the shelf. Note: This is to keep the drawers from sliding all the way through on my table which doesn't have drawer slides. If you are using drawer slides, you may not need these either.

Step 8: Center Shelf

Repeat step 4 to attach supports to the center rails as shown below:

Put the shelf in place as show below. If you want you can secure it to the supports using glue & 1 ¼” screws:

Step 9: Top Shelf

Repeat step 4 to attach the supports for the top shelf:

And set the top shelf in place and secure it as desired (again, mine is just sitting in there). Now your basic table is complete!


Step 10: Drawers

You will have 6 drawers total (which is different than the pottery version). You could also use baskets instead which would be sweet! If you are not using drawer slides, see my original plan for the drawers instead. To assemble the drawers, start by attaching the sides (M) to the short ends of the bottom (J):


Then attach the drawer back (L), keeping all edges flush:

Now install your drawer slides (before attaching the drawer front). This drawer is designed for a standard slide requiring 1/2″ clearance on each side of the drawer. Adjust so that there is an even fit around the drawers and the drawers slide smooth. Note: if you want more room to work you could assemble the drawers and fit the slides before installing the second and third shelves.

While the drawer box is in place, fit the drawer front (K) onto the front of the drawer box. Wiggle it around to get the front centered with an equal gap on all sides, then attach the front to the box using glue and finishing nails. Note: trace the box on the front with a pencil so you have an idea of where you will need to nail.

Step 11: Fill holes, sand and finish as desired.

I went with a dark espresso stain on my table.

But a bright coat of paint would be beautiful too! Maybe teal or yellow?


Step 12: Attach hardware to the drawers and you are done!

To get the same look as the inspiration table we ordered recessed ring pull hardware like this and used some matching label holders.


We got both in brass and antiqued them ourselves, but now they have other colors to choose from (and also some neat square pulls!).



The beauty part of home-built furniture is that you have no limitations! Make it your way and make it beautiful!


I hope you enjoy my updated plans. Let me know if you give it a try!

**UPDATES: I have been put to shame. Austin built a table from the plans and it turned out AMAZING! Love the cup handles and the rich color. And the corners look so perfect and tidy! (You can check out his pictures here.) Thanks for sharing!


Tyson Chenier made some adjustments to the original plans, adding another drawer under the tabletop. See more pictures here. Thanks for sharing!


Reddit user mnewhouse12 submitted his nearly-completed project to r/somethingimade.

And one more! Paul changed the dimensions to make a sweet square table, put two wider drawers on one side instead of three, and used a two tone finish! It turned out great! Thanks for sharing, Paul!


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55 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Congratulations on creating one of the most popular pieces of furniture on Pinterest. I hope people post here if they make one!

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    1. Thanks. :) That would be great! I'd love to see them!

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  3. just started making this table for woodworking in highschool really excited

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    1. Awesome! Let me know how it turns out, I'd LOVE to see pics when you are done! :)

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  4. Great plan! You mention using a dark expresso stain, but so many brands turn out different. I love the way your project turned out! What brand of stain and specific color name did you use?

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  5. Thank you! This is the stain I used:
    http://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-241412H-Varathane-Stain-Espresso/dp/B000RUODRO/ref=pd_sxp_f_r

    I ordered it online because I couldn't find it locally. To get the same finish as me, you'll have to apply it a little different than the directions say to make sure the grain shows up nicely. The way I did it was that I didn't let the stain soak in AT ALL. I dipped a rag into the stain, and rubbed it into the wood pretty fast so that it only picked up a little of the color. There wasn't any brushing it on or letting it sit. Just rubbing it on as fast as I could go, making sure not to leave any kind of puddles. Hope this helps!

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  6. I finally fished my table it has taken me a little longer then expected i have been very busy. But i love the turn out and the plans worked great thank you so much i would like to show you my final pictures but i dont think that i can upload pictures on this comment list.i will try and figure out a way

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  7. ok if you click on my name it should bring you to my google+ account and i just uploaded it to there so you should be able to see it thanks so much for the plans o n ps still havent had time to put handles on the drawers yet but will soon thanks again

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    1. Austin! It turned out AWESOME! Seriously, I think it looks better than mine. And I LOVE the stain you used! What color is that? Would you mind if I link to your picture in my post? This is the only other one I've seen done! :)

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    2. Well thank you very much! I just moved it into my new apartment and it looks awesome in there! The stain that i used was called red mahogany and that would be just fine if you posted the picture! Thank you so much for the plan.

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    3. Just updated the post to include your pic. Thanks again!

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  8. Great plan! I've been working on it, and was hoping I could ask for some advice - I'm in the final step of applying the wood finish (I've used a dark espresso stain), but there are still a lot of little splinters coming off of the plywood top. Is there anything I can do without having to re-sand, re-stain, and refinish everything?

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    1. Hmmm... I don't really know, I'm sorry to say. I might try lightly sanding the rough areas and just touching up the stain in those spots, but I can't guarantee that would work. :-/ If you want to ask some people with more experience than me I would recommend the forum on Ana's website: http://ana-white.com/community/building-support-and-help/finishing-support-and-advice?sort=asc&order=Replies. Hopefully someone there would be able to help!

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    2. I have been doing a lot of projects lately with old/distressed wood (from a fence that was knocked down by a tornado that hit our house last spring) and my wood usually always has some splinters because of its distressed nature...I like to add several light, thin coats of polyurethane or polycrylic as a finishing coat - it really helps prevent splintering. Here's a trunk I made from the distressed wood with a water-based polyurethane finish:
      http://house-capades.blogspot.com/2012/07/hi-my-name-is-callie-and-i-built.html

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  9. This is an awesome table! I'm about to do my first woodworking project and want this one to be the 2nd. Had a question: what kind of wood did you use in this build?

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  10. Oh! One more thing, in the list of tools you noted "Saw". Did you use a Circular or Miter saw for your cuts?

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    1. We just used a circular saw for this - we didn't even own a miter saw yet! A miter saw would be a little easier for cutting the 2x2's, but a circular saw works just fine. And you need a circular saw if you will be doing any of the plywood cuts yourself! :)

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  11. Just re-read and saw you mentioned the table was made with Pine--duh.*

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    1. I'm glad you found it, I'm so slow at answering! Ha ha. :) Yes, we used pine for the dimensional lumber and the plywood was called "project plywood" I believe. It has nice smooth sides so the table turns out smooth and pretty. :)

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    2. Awesome, thank you so much! I intend to start on this in the next couple weeks--I hope it turns out as nice and yours/Austin's.

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    3. I'd love to hear how it goes and see pictures if you get any! Good luck!

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  12. Just finished this table, thanks for the great plans. Made a few changes; used 1 x 12 instead of plywood, made 2 drawers on one side to allow for bigger items to be stored, made the table 3ft x 4ft. I used Kona stain for the table and Early American for the drawers. Photos can be seen here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pauldes2012

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    1. Wow Paul! That turned out great! I love that you put two drawers on one side, and the two tone finish is gorgeous. Could I share some of your pictures in the post?

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    2. Thanks! and yes you are more than welcome to share some of the photos on the post.

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  13. Nice job!! The table looks amazing!! Thanks for linking up at Romance on a dime!!

    I'm following you now. Hope to see you link up this Tuesday!

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  14. Paul, great job on the table i love the colors that you used

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  15. I can't wait to try to make this table! I was just wondering where to put the screws? I'm trying to look into the pictures of the finished table for any hints as to where the pieces were screwed together and I can't see any. Also, I've had bad experiences with the wood splitting when using screws on other projects. Do you have any tips I could use so that I can do this table without having the wood split? Maybe pre-drill the holes?

    Thanks so much!

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    1. Are you talking about the frame? I drilled through the front of the legs into the ends of the side boards, then through the outside edge of the legs into the front/back boards (just be careful not to hit your first screws when you drill the front/back holes). Does that make sense? The reason you can see the screws is because we used a countersink bit to sink them in (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000225OW/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0000225OW&linkCode=as2&tag=moliho-20) then filled the holes with a stainable wood filler. When we stained the table the filler made the holes blend right in!

      It’s important to pre-drill your holes! I’ve split a couple boards since still, but not nearly as many as before I started pre-drilling. (I’ve also heard that pine splits easier than some other kinds of wood. It’s still what we use because it’s so cheap, though!) If you do a lot of building you may want to think about getting a Kreg Jig (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044BBOQK/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B0044BBOQK&linkCode=as2&tag=moliho-20). It makes really strong joints and I’ve only split two boards since I started using it 2 years ago. They have great info and instructional videos on their website if you want to see how it works (http://www.kregtool.com/Pocket-Hole-Jigs-Prodlist.html). Hope this helps! 

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  16. love this! I really should have mentioned you in my Ana White tribute post... you're right up there with her as far as I'm concerned :) thanks for all the wonderful posts!

    R.O.R.

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    1. Wow, what a huge compliment! Thank you so much! I love Ana White! :)

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  17. In the directions it says to leave 7 1/4" between the bottom and center rails. However in the pictures it shows a 7 1/2" gap. Just wondering if this could be clarified? Thanks!!

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    1. Oops, it is supposed to be 7 1/2"! Thank you for pointing that out! I fixed the text in the post. :)

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  18. Your plans look great. I am looking to start this project but I'm having problems finding 2x2 pine. You also mention "project plywood" above in an earlier post. Where were you able to get these items?

    Thanks so much.

    Chad

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    1. Thanks! We got both of those at Lowe's. The 2x2s were in the section with stud lumber, not with the rest of the dimensional boards. The project plywood is just plywood with one side really nice and smooth, maybe if you describe it to an employee they could help point you find something similar? Hope this helps! :)

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  19. I love that table! I was wondering where you were able to find those drawer pulls - you mentioned that you ordered them, but I have been unable to find them anywhere. Also, what do you do to antique the brass?

    Thanks!

    Tom

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    1. It took some digging to find them, they are kind of hard to come by! Here are a few options from Amazon. The first is a smaller size with an antique bronze finish, the second is larger with an oil rubbed bronze finish:
      http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004FOLMUO/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B004FOLMUO&linkCode=as2&tag=moliho-20
      http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004FOOYN6/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B004FOOYN6&linkCode=as2&tag=moliho-20
      With these you wouldn't even have to worry about antiquing them! But if you end up finding brass ones, I sat them outside in ammonia and checked them every couple hours until they had a finish I liked. I did read that it doesn't always work and can mess up the metal though, so be careful! I couldn't find any finishes I liked so I decided to risk it and it worked out for me. :)

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  20. The table looks great! I'm planning on building a version of this after Christmas (I'm hoping to get my own tools). The question I have for you is how well the plywood held up without any cross support underneath it. Was there much (if any) deflection on either surface?

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    1. That was something I was worried about! But so far we haven't had any deflection at all. I can't say whether it will with more time, but so far it's holding up great!

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  22. I am a little confused, I bought and cut all of my materials already however I am stuck on step 1 haha. You called for two (N) pieces, yet in step one you say to put one on top edge of c and one on the bottom edge of C.Does this only go on one side panel or both meaning I need 4 (N) Pieces?

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    1. Oh, yes, you need 4! Sorry about that, thanks so much for pointing it out! I'll correct it! :)

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  23. I have completely struck out looking for drawer slides of the right length for these drawers. Any info on where I might find some?

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    1. We had to do some hunting, and finally found a Menards that carries them. Otherwise you could order them online, here are a few options.
      http://www.zorotools.com/g/00064403/k-G1225673?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Google_Shopping_Feed&kw={keyword}&gclid=CLD8pZLYibYCFWORPAodtVwA7Q
      http://www.doorcorner.com/pr10fuexbabe.html?utm_source=googlepepla&utm_medium=adwords&id=20005783933&utm_content=pla&gclid=CI_ChJTYibYCFY6PPAod2UEAwQ#sthash.iUx5MTTg.dpbs
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/250794433598?hlp=false&var=
      And there are lots more if you google it. Hope this helps!

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  24. Hi...

    Your legs is 2" wide, stiles at 1" wide and 14 1/2 gap in between. That would be 2x(2") + 2x(1") + 3x(14 1/2") which is 49 1/2 inches total which is 1 1/2 inch over the actual 4' dimension.

    Am I getting my math wrong? Or there is an error on the drawing.

    Ray

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    1. Hey Ray, the the named sizes of lumber are different than the actual dimensions. A 2x2 is actually 1 1/2 x 1 1/2, and a 1x2 is actually 3/4 x 1 1/2. So the math would be 2x(1 1/2") + 2(3/4") + 3x(14 1/2") = 48" total. :)

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    2. Got it... :) Thanks...

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  25. Just wanted to say thanks for the plans you posted. I accessed them through www.anawhite.com

    I have just finished this and it turned out very nice. I made an alteration so I could have a concealed keyboard drawer attached (as our TV viewing consists of Netflix, etc). Also masked the keyboard drawer with a flushed wooden piece and matched it around the table for uniformity.

    Here it is on Pinterest (with some other items I built)

    http://pinterest.com/tysonchenier/diy-built/

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    1. Thanks so much for sharing!! It looks fantastic, love how you added the keyboard drawer, and the hardware is great! I also love that media console - so pretty! Would you mind if I shared one of your pics in my post? I'll be sure to link it back to you. :)

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  26. Hi- my dad and I just finished building the table last night and we are ready to sand and stain! I am so excited to see how the table turns out. Thanks so much for the plans!!! Now I want to build the end tables to match!! I would love to send you pictures when it's done.

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    1. That would be wonderful! I love to see finished projects. :) You could email them to me at morelikehome (at) gmail (d0t) com. I would love to include your table in my post if you don't mind.

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  27. where did you buy the recessed ring pulls from? theyre so expensive

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    1. We ordered from Van Dyke's Restorers. You're right, they aren't cheap! Here is a sample from their site, but they have other colors and I believe other sizes as well: http://www.vandykes.com/flush-ring-recessed-pull/p/204529/

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  28. Thanks for the plans! I will be back when i get it finished.
    Just as a heads up for anyone else building it, I found my lumber costs to be significantly higher than $60. Mine totaled up to $165.33 just for lumber. Still a great deal over retail and I personally love making it myself.

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