Thursday, May 2

Simple Four-Poster Coffee Table Plans (Day 1)

I call this the "Four-Poster" coffee table because it reminds me a bit of a four-poster bed. We're kicking-off the DIY coffee table series with this guy because he's so easy to build, and because he's one of my very favorites in the series. I love the simple style with a farmhouse vibe. And for any beginner builders out there: no drawers + no doors = you've got this.


You do have one big decision to make, though. Do you want a slatted top (like the one above)? Or a plywood top (like the one below)? Slats add more character, but plywood gives you a smoother top for writing and drawing. Be warned it's hard to make plywood edges look good with stain or paint and you'll probably need to add plywood edge banding before you finish it. But if you leave the plwyood raw and just seal with Polycrylic, the raw edges are a beautiful and modern accent! So choose your weapon and let's build this guy!




Measure twice, cut once (seriously, though). Use glue in every step (be careful to clean up any drips, because they can mess up your finish at the end!). Read through all the instructions before you begin. Use 2" screws unless otherwise indicated. Pre-drill and countersink all your screws. Be safe, have fun, and let me know if you have any questions! Please note I have not built from these plans myself (you might be the first!), so double check everything as you go. 

Shopping List:
1  -  4x4  @  8' long
2  -  2x4  @  8' long
1  -  2x4  @  6' long
1  -  3/4" thick plywood project panel 4' x 4'
OR
2  -  1x8  @  8' long
1  -  1x4  @  8' long
Wood glue
Kreg Jig + 2 1/2" pocket hole screws
2" wood screws
wood filler
Sanding and finishing supplies 


Finished dimensions are 4' long, 3' deep, and 19" high (including the four-poster legs)

You can easily adjust the height of the legs. 
You can adjust the overall length by reducing or increasing the length of the sides and all the tabletop boards by the same amount. 
The easiest way to adjust the width is by removing one or two of the tabletop center boards and adjusting the length of the aprons and support boards accordingly. 

Cut List:
(A)  4  -  4x4  @  19"  (legs)
(B)  2  -  2x4  @  29"  (aprons)
(C)  2  -  2x4  @  41"  (sides)
(D)  3  -  2x4  @ 29"  (supports)
(E)  1  -  3/4 plywood  @  45 x 36"  (top)
OR
(F)  4  -  1x8  @  45"  (top center)
(G)  2  -  1x4  @  41"  (top sides)

Start by attaching a leg (A) to each end of the aprons (B). The apron should be flush with the outside face of the leg and set down 1 3/4" from the top of the leg. Use a Kreg jig to drill pocket holes in the ends of the aprons and use 2 1/2" pocket hole screws to attach them.


Attach the side boards (C) between the two end sections you just built. The side boards are set down 3 3/4" from the top of the legs. Make pocket holes in the ends of the side boards and use 2 1/2" pocket hole screws to attach them.


Install the supports (D) between the side boards. Put one board at each end and one roughly centered in the middle (it doesn't have to be exact. Hooray!). Make pocket holes in the ends of the support boards and use 2 1/2" pocket hole screws to attach them.


Now you can install the top. For a plywood top (F) you need to notch out the corners of the plywood. You can do this with a jig saw or regular circular saw. You should need to cut notches that are 3.5 x 2", but measure to double check and be careful to cut them facing the right direction! You can either use finishing nails to attach it from the top by nailing into the sides and supports, or flip the table over and use 2" screws to attach it from below by drilling through the sides and supports into the top board. The second method will eliminate any holes on your beautiful top, but you must be careful not to drill all the way through.


For the slatted top, install the center top boards (F) and the side top boards (G) over the sides and supports. You can either use finishing nails to attach them from the top by nailing into the sides and supports, or flip the table over and use 2" screws to attach them from below by drilling through the sides and supports into the top boards. The second method will eliminate any holes on your beautiful top, but you must be careful not to drill all the way through.


You're almost done! To finish, fill any visible holes with wood filler then sand everything down really well. This is the most important step for a professional finish! Start with a rough sand paper, then go over everything with a medium paper, then again with a fine paper. Once it's super smooth, finish it with whatever paint or stain and sealer you like.


I love to see your finished projects! Tag me on instagram @more.like.home or share them on our facebook page!

Want more plans? Check out the rest of the coffee table series here and all our other building plans here!

1 comment:

  1. Thank you again for all the knowledge you distribute,Good post. I was very interested in the article, it's quite inspiring I should admit. I like visiting you site since I always come across interesting articles like this one.Great Job, I greatly appreciate that.Do Keep sharing! Regards, coffee

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